Last edited by Mazubei
Friday, May 1, 2020 | History

1 edition of Coca in Bolivia found in the catalog.

Coca in Bolivia

Coca in Bolivia

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  • 2 Currently reading

Published by UFLA/NIDA, TUTAPI in La Paz, Bolivia .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Bolivia.
    • Subjects:
    • Indians of South America -- Drug use -- Bolivia.,
    • Coca -- Bolivia.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 47-85 (2nd group)

      StatementWilliam E. Carter ... [et al.].
      ContributionsCarter, William E.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsF3320.1.N37 C63 1980
      The Physical Object
      Pagination762, 85 p., [3] leaves of plates :
      Number of Pages762
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3062899M
      LC Control Number82159085


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Coca in Bolivia Download PDF EPUB FB2

That vision of an expanding international market for legal coca products – such as flour, tea and ointments – is shared widely in Bolivia, and it was the driving force for a recent law signed Author: Linda Farthing in La Paz. Coca in Bolivia - Wikipedia.

Books shelved as bolivia: Los afectos by Rodrigo Hasbún, Marching Powder: A True Story of Friendship, Cocaine, and South America's Strangest Jail by Rust. Bolivia went from being the No. 2 producer of coca, shipping much of its cocaine to the United States, to a distant third after Colombia and Peru, with most of the drug headed to Brazil.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Cover title: Bolivia & coca. Description: xiv, pages: illustrations, maps. Despite the previous restrictions, in20, hectares of land in Bolivia was "under coca bush cultivation", according to UN figures, representing 15% of the world total.

Coca leaf vendors sell to clients at a coca market in La Paz, Bolivia, Monday, Sept. Coca leaves are the basis for cocaine, but they also are a sacred plant among Andes natives. South America’s longest-serving president, Bolivia’s Evo Morales was part of a wave of leftist leaders who reshaped Latin American politics during the s.

Unlike like-minded allies in. CCTV Correspondent Daniel Schweimler travels to Bolivia and explores how the cocoa leaf is much more than a fundamental ingredient to produce.

Rare Alphabet Book of Coca-Cola Published by the Coca-Cola Co., Coca Cola Co. Marketing Piece, Coca Cola Advertisement, Coke History GoodVintageHunting 5 out of 5. The growing of coca leaves is legal and licensed in Bolivia.

The policy has been credited with a fall in cocaine production in the country, leading some experts to see the Bolivian model as a Author: Jamie Doward. The decision of Coca-Cola's ban in Bolivia came in a time when the country is pledging to legalize the consumption of coca leaves, which are notoriously processed clandestinely into cocaine, and Author: Anderson Antunes.

Coca, as Bolivians never tire of mentioning, isn’t cocaine. Chewing of the thumb-size leaf dates to pre-Inca times, and causes hardly more than a caffeine buzz. Bolivia stands up to US with coca-control policy.

Thumbing its nose at the 'war on drugs', help for farmers has spurred a major drop in cocaine production since   Coca, widely known as the main ingredient in cocaine, has been grown in the Andes for centuries. In Bolivia, an estimated third of the population consumes the leaf in natural form as if it were.

Bolivia - Among the many brick buildings along a bleak plain in this impoverished city, four brothers mix medicinal syrups and creams from coca leaf, the raw ingredient of cocaine. Morales, a.